UTeach Dallas pbi course Syllabus


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UTeach Dallas PBI Course Syllabus

NATS 4341

Spring 2017
Contact Information__________________________________________________________________________________

Kate York kate.york@utdallas.edu Katie Donaldson katie.donaldson@utdallas.edu

Office 972.883.2498 Office 972.883.6427

Office Location FN 3.410A (UTeach Center) Office Location FN 3.308M

Office Hours Anytime but Tuesday mornings or Friday mornings Office Hours Anytime but Thursday afternoon or Friday mornings

Other Information Walk-ins are fine, but uncertain due to field supervision.

Call or email ahead is recommended.

Class Website: www.uteachdallaspbi.weebly.com

Prerequisites___________________________________________________________________________________________

Knowing and Learning, Successful completion of Preliminary Portfolio in CI

Additional Requirements: Students must use a word processor, e-mail and have access to a web browser. If these requirements cannot be fulfilled, please see instructor.
Course Rationale_______________________________________________________________________________________

Project-based instruction engages learners in exploring authentic, important, and meaningful questions of real concern to students. Through a dynamic process of investigation and collaboration and using the same processes and technologies that scientists, mathematicians, and engineers use, students work in teams to formulate questions, make predictions, design investigations, collect and analyze data, make products and share ideas. Students learn fundamental science and mathematical concepts and principles that they apply to their daily lives. Project-based instruction promotes equitable and diverse participation and engages students in learning.
Course Description_____________________________________________________________________________________

PBI has three essential components:


  • Theory-driven perspective: Students learn about how people learn and how project-based instruction may be among our most informed classroom learning environments for bridging the gap between theory and practice.

  • Instructional Development: Technological and pedagogical content knowledge are developed as UTeach students work toward the design of project-based units. Competency is continually built as students read about and discuss the principles of PBI; reflect on observations of project-based learning environments in high school settings; and incorporate what they are learning into the design of problem-based lessons and ultimately, an entire project-based unit.

  • Field Experience: An intensive field component includes observation of well-implemented project-based instruction in local schools as well as implementation of problem-based lessons with area high school students.


Perspective_____________________________________________________________________________________________

A major hurdle in implementing project-based curricula is that they require simultaneous changes in curriculum, instruction and assessment practices – changes that are often foreign to students, as well as practicing teachers. In this course we will develop an approach to designing, implementing and evaluating problem- and project-based curricula and processes for PBI curriculum development that has emerged from collaboration with teachers and researchers. Previous research has identified four common design principles that appear to be especially important: (1) defining learning appropriate goals that lead to deep understanding; (2) providing scaffolds such as beginning with problem-based learning activities before completing a project; using “embedded teaching”, “teaching tools” and a set of “contrasting cases”; (3) including multiple opportunities for formative self-assessment; (4) developing social structures that promote participation and revision. We will first discuss these principles individually and then compare them to other design principles suggested by other groups involved with project-based instruction.
Required Course Materials___________________________________________________________________________

Text Books:

BIE. (2003). Project based learning handbook: A guide to standards-focused project based learning for middle and high school teachers (2nd ed.). Oakland, CA: Wilsted & Taylor. ISBN-0-9740343-0-4. Available for check-out through UTeach Dallas. May be purchased at Bookstore or online at http://www.bie.org/index.php/site/PBL/pbl_handbook/
Krajcik, J. S., & Czerniak, C. M. (2007).Teaching science in elementary and middle school: A project-based approach, (4th ed.). New York: Routledge. ISBN-978-0415534055.
Larmer, J., Mergendoller, J., & Boss, S. (2015). Setting the standard for project based learning: A proven approach to rigorous classroom instruction. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. ISBN-978-1-4166-2033-4.
Other:

Additional reading selections pertinent to projects or discussions during the course may be provided on eLearning and/or the course website.
Course Objectives and Evidence of Student Learning and Engagement__________________________


Students will

Evidence:

Discuss and critique the merits of project-based instruction in terms of student’s cognitive development, equity and motivation.

In-class and online discussions

A project-based unit that includes a rationale and objectives

A grant proposal to implement a project-based unit that includes a rationale and potential impact

Reflect on applications of educational theory as it relates to classroom practice in the area of project-based instruction.

In-class and online discussions

A grant proposal to implement a project-based unit that includes a rationale and potential impact

Distinguish between project-based instruction and other instructional approaches and decide which approach best fits instructional goals based on the benefits and limitations of each.

In-class and online discussions

A project-based unit that includes benchmark lessons and a lesson sequence that incorporates appropriate instructional approaches.

Evaluate the usefulness of technology in achieving learning objectives and select appropriate resources for student use based on the relationship of salient features of the technology to learning objectives.

An annotated list of relevant resources and technological tools for a project-based unit

Classroom presentation utilizing technology tools

Use inquiry methods with secondary students in a problem-based setting.

A project-based unit that includes benchmark lessons and a lesson sequence that incorporates appropriate instructional approaches.

Feedback from mentor teachers as evidence of UTeach students leading problem-based activities in a field setting

Describe examples of project-based instruction in math or science and analyze those examples in terms of several well-studied, field-tested models for PBI.

In-class and online discussions

Field observations of project-based classrooms

Demonstrate skill in setting up and managing wet lab project-based environments.

Evidence of UTeach students setting up and managing wet lab project-based environment in the field

Use PBL design principles to develop an interdisciplinary, three to four-week project-based unit for secondary math and/or science courses.

A project-based unit including an entry event/video, entry document, calendar, rationale, objectives, theoretical basis for the project, concept map, benchmark lessons, investigations, alternative assessments, strategies for differentiating instruction for students with special needs, related resources and technology tools.

Develop alternative assessments appropriate for project-based instruction.

Problem-based lessons that include alternative assessments

A project-based unit that includes alternative assessments

Discuss lab safety and liability issues related to project based instruction and wet-lab or field environments (Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, how to read materials safety data sheets, safe disposal of chemicals, etc.)

Participation in class discussion on safety and liability issues

A project-based unit that includes safety precautions

Use relevant technology to develop projects (e.g., concept mapping software, video editing software, etc.).

Technology-based or developed project elements

Integrate relevant technology into curricular units (e.g., Internet, simulations, data analysis packages, modeling software, etc.).

A project-based unit that includes lessons that integrate the use of technology

Plan instruction that promotes equitable and diverse participation so that all students have an opportunity to learn.

A project-based unit that includes lesson plans documenting modifications for special populations

Engage in strategic partnerships and collaborations, including global and/or informal education organizations, in order to broaden instructional resource knowledge and strength 21st century skills development.

Partnerships and collaborations with global and/or informal education organizations

Development of 21st century/professionalism skills

A project-based unit that includes design, instruction, and assessment of K-12 student 21st century skills

Partnerships and collaborations with class peers, global, and informal education contacts


Study Trip Component: Field-Based Teaching Experiences_________________________________________

Students will be provided with opportunities for working in classrooms teaching a project-based lesson that could be used to introduce a project-based instructional unit. A total of 11 field-based hours are required (breakdown listed below). Kate York and Katie Donaldson will be coordinating these field experiences.
Observations. Each UTeach Dallas student is required to spend 8 hours observing secondary school classes that are structured around the project-based method of teaching. They are to record their observations and answer specific focus questions, and then submit a reflection document via eLearning. The information gathered in these observations is also used to inform the class discussions of the peer-reviewed literature on project-based instruction. There is a form posted to eLearning that must be signed by the classroom teacher to verify their presence during these observations. Students will be provided with classroom teacher contact information and schedules to better plan these observations.
*Please note that an OPTIONAL PBI Field Trip has been TENTATIVELY scheduled for the class on Thursday, February 16th, from 9:00-11:00 a.m. at Coppell New Tech High School; attending this field trip will earn two (2) hours of observation. This date is subject to change; notice will be provided.
*Please note that a OPTIONALWhat to Expect?: Advice from Current ATs session has been scheduled for Thursday, April 6th, from 5:30-6:30 p.m. This session will provide practical advice from ATs currently “in the field” about what to expect during your student teaching experience.
Classroom Teaching. Each UTeach Dallas student is required to spend 3 hours in instructional delivery in a secondary school classroom that is structured around the project-based method of teaching. They are to record their reflections of their experience, answer specific focus questions, and then submit the reflection document via eLearning. The information gathered in this reflection is also used to inform the class discussions of the peer-reviewed literature on project-based instruction. There is a form posted to the course web site that must be signed by the classroom teacher to verify their presence during these observations. Students will be provided with classroom teacher contact information and schedules to better plan the instructional delivery.
CERTIFICATION PRACTICE EXAM__________________________________________________________________________
Students are encouraged to take practice TExES and content PPR EC-12 exams, which are provided at no charge by the TDC. To schedule a practice exam, contact the TDC at 972-883-2730.
GLOBAL AND INFORMAL EDUCATION EXPERIENCES COMPONENT______________________________________
Global Collaboration/Digital Citizenship:

In the global society in which we now live, providing students with opportunities to practice digital and global citizenship and to foster global competence, awareness, and appreciation is an important learning outcome. As such, students in this class will engage in global instructional experiences in order to help practice and develop skills that can be transferred into and applied in classrooms and instructional design with their future students. Project-based instruction provides an ideal platform for infusing classroom global experiences on multiple levels, and allows students additional opportunities to engage in and develop critical 21st century skills. These activities will be embedded in the course projects and discussions, as appropriate (see eLearning).
Informal Education:

Informal education provides an additional means of engaging students with content and with real-world applications. Informal education includes such resources as parks, museums, etc., and can be a valuable addition to the classroom. As such, students in this class will engage in an informal education experience. These activities will be embedded in the course projects and discussions, as appropriate (see eLearning).
*Please note that a MANDATORY PBI Field Trip has been scheduled for Friday, March 3rd, from 7:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. at the Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center in Athens, TX. More information will be provided by the course instructors. Failure to attend this field trip will be treated as an unexcused absence and will result in an eight (8) point deduction in grade.
ASSIGNMENTS_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Project #1: Introduction to PBI Immersion Project

This is an introduction to PBI through immersion. Students will engage in and a complete a small PBI lesson as a way of learning the components and processes of PBI. This project will contain a global collaboration piece. Project details will be posted in eLearning.
Project #2: 3-day PBI Field-Based Lesson DEsign

UTD UTeach students prepare a PBI lesson in assigned teams (3 class periods in length) to be taught in the secondary math or science class of their assigned mentor teacher. The unit will be prepared to meet curricular objectives and state and national standards for the class of their assigned mentor teacher and will be instructed over three consecutive days (or other time frame mutually agreed upon by the mentor teacher, course instructor, and students). The unit will include components as described in the project details and will be assessed using a rubric (see eLearning and/or the class website). There is no required global or informal education component for this project. Project details will be posted in eLearning.
Project #3: 2-week PBI Unit Design

UTD UTeach students prepare a PBI unit (2 weeks in length) in assigned teams, incorporating secondary mathematics and science content. The unit will include components as described within eLearning and will be assessed using a rubric (see eLearning). This project culminates in a final presentation. This project will contain an informal education piece, which will be included in the project details on eLearning.
Discussions______________________________________________________________________________________________

Online Discussions over Reading Assignments: Students will participate in weekly reading assignments with questions posted on eLearning’s online discussion board. Students will read the assigned selections and respond to prompts. These will take place prior to class sessions and will serve as a launching point for the student-led in class discussions each week. Refer to the course calendar for topics and due dates.
In Class Discussions: Students lead in-class discussions that will tie together theory from the reading material with their field experiences. Students will sign up in pairs for a turn as a discussion leader for small group discussions of the peer reviewed literature assigned. The roles and responsibilities of the discussion leaders are to:

  1. Read all class discussion posts PRIOR to the in-class session and be prepared to summarize the class responses on the

discussion board to the focus questions provided by the instructor; and

b) Prepare a thirty (30) minute max forum on the topic:

1. Leader will use a research-based learning activity, for the purpose of extending and deepening student thinking

about the assigned readings and how they compare to their observations in project-based classrooms. An example

might be a round robin discussion format, a role play applying principles learned in the readings, or an interactive

formative assessment probe over the reading.

2. Leader must have the participants discuss APPLYING the concepts presented in the material, not just rehashing

the topics that they have read.
21st Century/ PROFESSIONALISM skills_________________________________________________________________
A central part of Project-Based Instruction is the development of 21st century/professionalism skills, including, but not limited to*:

  • Information, Media, and Technological skills

  • Creativity, Critical Thinking, Communication, and Collaboration skills

  • Life and Career skills

  • Content and 21st Century Themes (global awareness; financial, civic, health, and environmental literacies)

*adapted from the P21 Framework for 21st Century Learning
In addition to learning about these skills and including them in the design of the activities and assignments in the course, it is important UTeach Dallas students practice these skills and grow professionally in their own development of these skills. Therefore, these skills will be assessed formatively in this course periodically throughout the semester, and will include self-evaluations, peer evaluations, and instructor evaluations. Feedback will be provided, along with coaching for growth. Additionally, students will be assessed summatively by the instructional team at the end of the semester. A rubric for these skills will be provided in eLearning. If you have any questions regarding the formative/summative evaluations and the points associated with them for the course, contact a member of the instructional team.
As a student in this course, you are expected to comply with the Code of Ethics and Standard Practice for Texas Educators and the Fitness to Teach Policy.
UT Dallas Practicing Teacher Compliance Policies (§228.30(b)(2), (§228.50)) As a student in this course, you are expected to comply with:

  1. Texas Administrative Code (TAC), Title 19, Part 7, Chapter 247, Rule §247.2 – Code of Ethics and Standard Practices for Texas Educators

http://info.sos.state.tx.us/pls/pub/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=19&pt=7&ch=247&rl=2

  1. UT Dallas Fitness to Teach Policy (see course home page – eLearning)


UTeach Dallas Complaints Procedure

You have the right to raise a concern or lodge a complaint and to seek redress in areas where you feel that the program did not fulfill requirements for certification or for actions that you feel are wrong.

To raise a concern or file a complaint:

Contact UTeach Dallas Associate Director, Katie Donaldson, with your complaint at kate.donaldson@utdallas.edu or 972-883-6427.

If your concern is not resolved to your satisfaction and you want to speak with someone else, contact UTeach Dallas Co-Director, Dr. Mary Urquhart, at urquhart@utdallas.edu or 972-883-6485 to schedule an appointment.

All conferences are confidential.

The University of Texas at Dallas Student Complaint Resources page is also a resource and may be found at http://catalog.utdallas.edu/2013/undergraduate/resources/student-complaints

You also have the right to file a complaint about UTeach Dallas directly to the Texas Education Agency (TEA) at www.tea.texas.gov.
PORTFOLIO_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Your portfolio is a culminating project for the UTeach Dallas Certification Program. It demonstrates what you have learned through your teaching and learning experiences and how you have developed into a teacher ready for certification in the state of Texas.
The portfolio is divided into seven sections. For section 1, you will provide information about your teaching philosophy and academic work, along with samples of professional documents such as a cover letter and resume. Sections 2-7 are comprised of large categories, such as Professional Responsibilities, Subject Matter Knowledge, Equity and Individualized Learning, etc., that are divided into subsections. For sections 2-7, you will provide tangible evidence that you meet these proficiencies.
Some sections require specific evidence, so read all directions carefully. These directions are provided in eLearning. In general, evidence consists of lesson plans, samples of student work, letters and forms sent to parents and family, results of field observations, essays, exams, quizzes, and other coursework, both UTeach Dallas classes and classes in the content area (mathematics, chemistry, etc.). The expectation is that your portfolio will exhibit evidence from all of your UTeach classes and will come from diverse and multiple sources.
The entire portfolio creation is to be created during the PBI semester, and is a prerequisite for Apprentice Teaching; however only the following 3 portfolio components will be assessed during this course. Students must earn a 2 or better on the rubric for each portfolio piece (see the rubric in eLearning). Portfolio components required for PBI:

  • Section 6, Part 1 (Student Engagement)

  • Section 6, Part 2 (Questioning and Assessment Techniques)

  • Section 6, Part 3 (Technology)


All other components of the portfolio created during this semester will be evaluated by course instructors with Apprentice Teaching.

All Portfolio items FOR THIS COURSE, WHICH ARE LISTED IN THE PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS DOCUMENT IN ELEARNING, are required to be satisfactorily completed in order to complete the course.

Course SeQuENCE

A tentative semester overview is provided below and in the additional course calendar. Every attempt will be made to adhere to the schedule provided, but the instructor reserves the right to make changes as needed. Announcements about these changes will be made in class and posted in eLearning.


Date

Lesson Focus

Assigned Reading

Assigned Homework

TEA

1/13

Focus: Intro to PBI Model Lesson
In class activities: PBI model lesson; intro to managing classes with a course website; course overview; development of knows and need to knows; discuss portfolio website; review code of ethics, FTT

None assigned

* Assigned reading and discussion for following week


Demo Lesson: 1.4K

Code of Ethics: 4.13-15K
§228.30 (a)

§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-11, 13-16

1/20

Focus: Learning Theories and PBI
In class activities: Students receive MS/HS TEKS for incorporation of standards into lesson plans; student led discussion of reading; fair use; activities regarding the PBI process and aligning to standards (TEKS) as well as CCRS and SCANS. Discuss field trip to NTH@C; project #1 presentations and discussion post with global partners.

Reading and discussion board: Larmer, et al. Chapters 1-3, p. 1-65 and Krajcik Chapter 2 p. 24-52

* Assigned reading and discussion for the following week

*Project #1 Presentations

* Portfolio website creation due next week.



Reading/Discussion: 1.4K, 1.11K

TEKS/standards Activity: 1.7K-1.10K, 1.19K

Global Partners: 4.4K
§228.30 (a)

§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-11, 13-16

1/27

Focus: Designing PBI Experiences
In class activities: Student led discussion of reading; mentor meeting expectations; components and processes of PBI

Reading and discussion board:

Larmer, et al. Chapter 4, p. 66-98

* Assigned reading and discussion for the following week

* Portfolio website due today

* Meet the Mentor (1/27 or 1/31)


Reading/Discussion: 1.4K, 1.10K, 1.23K

Components of PBI Activity: 1.4K

Meet the Mentor: 4.3K, 4.4K, 4.6K

§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-11, 13-16

2/3

Focus: Constructing Meaning

(Driving Questions)
In class activities: Review mentor meeting; student led discussion of reading; importance of driving questions development, learning objectives development, relation to standards, and understanding by design (UBD) framework; relevance of launch events and entry documents; critical friends session for driving question; 3-day lesson design

Reading and discussion board: Krajcik Chapter 3, p. 53-82; Handbook p. 37-42

* Assigned reading and discussion for the following week

* Driving question for 3-day lesson design due today


Reading/Discussion:

1.12K-1.15K

Driving Question/Learning Objectives Activity: 1.12K-1.15K

Standards Activity: 1.7K-1.10K, 1.19K
§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-11, 13-16

2/10

Focus: Assessment For and Of Learning
In class activities: Student led discussion of reading; importance of student learning assessment; types of assessment; relation to state assessments; teacher responsiveness; creation of rubrics for content, presentation, and 21st century skills; access online rubric applications; critical friends session for entry document and launch event; 3-day lesson design

Reading and discussion board: Krajcik Chapter 8, p. 226-285; Handbook p. 45-80

* Assigned reading and discussion for the following week

* Launch event and entry document for 3-day lesson design due today

* Technology portfolio piece due today


Reading/Discussion: 1.24K, 1.31K

State/District Assessments Activity: 1.30K, 1.31K

Rubric Creation Activity: 1.24K-1.31K, 3.12K-3.16K

Technology Portfolio Piece: 1.17K, 1.22K, 1.28K

§228.30 (b) 4-11, 13-16

2/17

Focus: Collaboration in the PBI Classroom
In class activities: Student led discussion of reading; fostering and assessing collaboration (21st century skills) in the PBI classroom; critical friends session for assessment mechanisms; 3-day lesson design

Reading and discussion board: Krajcik Chapter 6, p. 147-187


* Assigned reading for the following week

* Assessment mechanisms for 3-day lesson design (rubrics) due today

* Assessment portfolio piece due today

* Field trip to CNTHS 2/16 TENTATIVE)

Reading/Discussion:2.2K-2.3K, 2.7K

Rubric (Assessment Mechanisms) Creation: 1.24K-1.31K, 3.12K-3.16K

Assessment Portfolio Piece: 1.24K-1.31K, 3.12K-3.16K

§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-11, 13-16

2/24

Focus: Equity and Classroom Facilitation in PBI
In class activities: Student led discussion reading; reflections on observations of PBI classrooms; global partnership initial reflections; discuss modifications and accommodations for differentiated instruction in PBI; inclusive instruction; ELL strategies, critical friends session on project calendars; 3-day lesson design

Reading: Krajcik Chapter 9 p. 286-336; Handbook p. 97-124

* Assigned reading for the following week

* Project calendar, workshops, and DIYs for 3-day lesson design due today

* Engagement portfolio piece due today

* Submit final 3-day lesson design to mentor teacher by 2/28

Reading/Discussion: 1.5K-1.6K, 2.1K-2.13K

Inclusive Instruction Activities:1.3K,1.6K, 1.14K, 2.1K, 2.23K

3-Day Lesson Design Components: 1.16K-1.18K, 1.20K-1.21K, 3.1K-3.11K

Engagement Portfolio Piece: 2.3K, 3.6K-3.7K, 4.12K

§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-16

3/3

Focus: Global Collaboration and Informal Education in PBI
In class activities: Final submission of 3-day lesson design; infusing global collaboration and informal education into PBI projects; launch of 2-week unit design (Project #3); discussion of inclusion of special populations accommodations/ modifications; I

None assigned



*Field trip to the Athens Freshwater Fisheries Center 3/3


Inclusive Instruction Activities:1.3K,1.6K, 1.14K, 2.1K, 2.23K

2-Week Lesson Design Components: 1.16K-1.18K, 1.20K-1.21K, 3.1K-3.11K
§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-16

3/10

Focus: 21st Century Skills
In class activities: Discuss importance of 21st century skills competencies; critical friends session for driving question; 2-week unit design

None assigned

* Driving question for 2-week unite design due today

* Observation Reflections due today

*Teach week #1


Reflection Piece: 4.12K

Driving Question/Learning Objectives Activity: 1.12K-1.15K

21st CS Discussion: 2.1K-2.3K, 2.7K, 2.17K

Lesson Teach: 1.1S-1.23S; 2.1S-2.21S, 3.1S-3.20S, 4.5S-4.10S, 4.12S-4.14S, 4.16S, 4.17S

§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-11, 13-16

3/24

Focus: Technology Integration
In class activities: Discussion of instructional technology, types, and applications in the classroom; critical friends session for launch event and entry document; 2-week multidisciplinary unit design

None assigned

* Launch event and entry document for 2-week unit design due today

*Teach week #2

Multidisciplinary Lesson Design: 1.10K, 1.23K

Technology Activity: 1.22K, 1.28K

Lesson Teach: 1.1S-1.23S; 2.1S-2.21S, 3.1S-3.20S, 4.5S-4.10S, 4.12S-4.14S, 4.16S, 4.17S

§228.30 (b)44, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16

3/31

Focus: 2-week unit design
In class activities: Work on finalizing the plan for the 2-week project, reflection including: process management, assessments, scaffolded learning, inquiry investigations and benchmark lessons, as needed; create workshops and DIYs aligned to standards; critical friends session for assessment mechanisms

None assigned

* Assessment mechanisms for 3-week unit design (rubrics) due today

* 3-day lesson design/teach reflection due today

* Observation hours due today



Reflection Piece: 4.12K

Rubric (Assessment Mechanisms) Creation: 1.24K-1.31K, 3.12K-3.16K


4/7

Focus: 2-week unit design
In class activities: Work on finalizing the plan for the 2-week project; grant proposals; critical friends session for project calendar/student products

None assigned

* Project calendar, workshops, and DIYs for 2-week unit design due today

* What to Expect: Advice from Current ATs 4/6

Multidisciplinary Lesson Design Components: 1.16K-1.18K, 1.20K-1.21K, 3.1K-3.11K
§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-11, 13-16

4/14

Focus: 2-week unit design
In class activities: Work on finalizing the plan for the 2-week project; grant proposals; critical friends session for project calendar/student products

Not assigned

* Sample student products due today

Multidisciplinary Lesson Design Components: 1.16K-1.18K, 1.20K-1.21K, 3.1K-3.11K
§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-11, 13-16

4/21

Focus: Benefits and Challenges of PBI
In class activities: Discussion of benefits, challenges, and barriers off PBI instruction and implementation; professional development; finalize 2-week unit design and sample student products critical friends session of 2-3 week project plan

Reading: Krajcik Chapter 11, p. 376-390

* Final submission of 2-week unit design due today


Reading/Discussion: 3.15K-3.16K, 4.9K, 4.12K-4.14K

Multidisciplinary Lesson Design Components: 1.16K-1.18K, 1.20K-1.21K, 3.1K-3.11K
§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-11, 13-16

4/28

Focus: Course Wrap-up
In class activities: 2-week unit design project presentations

None assigned

* Final 2-week unit design presentations

Presentations: Comprehensive
§228.30 (b) 4-7, 9-11, 13-16


GRADING

Percentage Breakdown

The following is the grading breakdown for the class requirements (100 pts. total).


Discussions…………………...

Discussion Leader……………

Observations Reflection..…… Teaching Reflection…………

Lesson Teach Evaluation……

Project #1…………………….

Project #2…………………….

Project #3…………………….

21st CS/ Professionalism…….

Portfolio Pieces……………..

Portfolio Website Creation....

7%

3%

5%

5%

17%

5%

15%

30%

8%

3%

2%










Pass/Fail Requirements

The following items must be completed satisfactorily and turned in during this course in order to receive a passing grade.


  • 3-Day Lesson Design and Teaching Mentor Feedback

  • Field Experience Log

  • Portfolio Creation and Required Components at a Level 2 or better on the rubric

Other Grading Policies

Timeliness of work/assignment submissions, class attendance, classroom citizenship, etc., are components of the 21st century/ professionalism rubric. While not stand-alone grades, the mastery of these skills will be reflected in the 21st century/ professionalism summative grade (8%). The course instructor should be notified in advance of the need to submit an assignment after the due date.

Attendance: Class attendance is vital. The course instructor should be notified in advance of class absences. Unexcused absences (no advance notification) will result in an 8 point reduction in grade for each absence. Unexcused absences (with advanced notification) will result in a 5 point reduction in grade. Excused absences (with advance notification- medical or illness) or tardies will result in a 2 point reduction in grade for each excused absence or tardy.
Grading Scale: 100-98 = A+ 97-94 = A 93-90 = A- 89-88= B+ 87-84 = B 83-80= B- 79-78 = C+ 77-74 = C 73-70=C- 69-68= D+ 67-64= D 63-60= D- Below 60 = F


These descriptions and timelines are subject to change at the discretion of the professor.
University Policies and Procedures
The information below can be found at http://go.utdallas.edu/syllabus-policies

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UTeach Dallas pbi course Syllabus icon* copyright (C) 1984-2017 merrill consultants, dallas, texas *

UTeach Dallas pbi course Syllabus icon* copyright (C) 1984-2010 merrill consultants dallas texas usa *

UTeach Dallas pbi course Syllabus icon* copyright (C) 1984-2011 merrill consultants dallas texas usa *

UTeach Dallas pbi course Syllabus icon* copyright (C) 1984-2017 merrill consultants dallas texas usa *

UTeach Dallas pbi course Syllabus iconGabriel’s Rapture Sylvain Reynard Omnific Publishing Dallas Information




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