The following rules that are based on the rules of the International Science and Engineering Fair (isef) must be followed. A copy of the isef rules may be


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NameThe following rules that are based on the rules of the International Science and Engineering Fair (isef) must be followed. A copy of the isef rules may be
A typeDocumentation

Student Activities Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook

Display Safety Standards

The following rules that are based on the rules of the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) must be followed. A copy of the ISEF rules may be obtained online at www.sciserv.org/isef.

Note: The following rules only apply to what is included in the actual display. The following items can be used for the project only if they are represented by photographs, drawings, or artificial items in the actual display.

  1. Not Allowed in Project Display

Anything potentially dangerous to the public is prohibited in your ACSI Science Fair display, including, but not limited to, the following as determined by the entrant's adult sponsors and the event chair:

  1. No living organisms, including plants

  2. No taxidermy specimens or parts

  3. No preserved vertebrate or invertebrate animals

  4. No human or animal food

  5. No human/animal parts or body fluids (for example, blood, urine)

  6. No plant materials (living, dead, or preserved) that are in their raw, unprocessed, or non manufactured state (exception: manufactured construction materials used in building the project or display)

  7. No laboratory/household chemicals, including water (exceptions: water that is integral to an enclosed ap­paratus)

  8. No poisons, drugs, controlled substances, hazardous substances or devices (for example, firearms, weapons, ammunition, reloading devices)

  9. No dry ice or other sublimating solids

  10. No sharp items (for example, syringes, needles, pipettes, knives)

  11. No flames or highly flammable materials

  12. No batteries with open-top cells

  13. No photographs or other visual presentations depicting vertebrate animals in surgical techniques, dissections, necropsies, or other lab procedures

14. N:> active Internet or email connections as part of displaying or operating the project at the ACSI Science Fair

  1. No glass or glass objects unless deemed by the entrant's adult sponsors and event chair to be an integral and necessary part of the project (exception: glass that is an integral part of a commercial product such as a computer screen)

  2. No apparatus deemed unsafe by the entrant's adult sponsors and the event chair (for example, large vacuum tubes or dangerous ray-generating devices, empty tanks that previously contained combustible liquids or gases, pressurized tanks)

  3. Allowed in Project Display but with the Restrictions Indicated

  4. Soil or waste samples if permanently encased in a slab of acrylic

  5. Postal addresses, World Wide Web andemail addresses, telephone numbers, and fax number of the en­trant only

© 2006 ACSI~ .


9

Student Activities Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook
Display Safety Standards continued
10


3. Photographs and/or visual depictions if

  1. They are not deemed offensive by the entrant's adult sponsors and the event chair

  2. Their origins are credited (such as the photographer, a website, magazines, newspapers, journals)

  3. They are photographs or visual depictions of the entrant

d) They are photographs of human subjects who have signed consent forms

  1. Rockets or any apparatus with unshielded belts, pulleys, chains, and moving parts with tension or pinch points if for display only and not operated

5. Class II lasers if

  1. Operated only by the entrant, and only during judging

  2. Labeled with a sign reading "Laser Radiation: Do Not Stare into Beam"

  3. Enclosed in protective housing that prevents physical and visual access to the beam d) Disconnected when not being operated

  4. Class III and IV lasers if only for display and not operated

  5. If adequately insulated, any apparatus producing temperatures that will cause physical burns

8. Behavioral studies for which there are signed consent forms (See ISEF forms listed on Project Approval Form.)

  1. Electrical Regulations at the ACSI Science Fair

  2. Entrants requiring 120 or 220 Volt A.c. electric circuits (maximum allowed and as available at facility) must provide a UL-Iisted 3-wire extension cord that is appropriate for the load and equipment.

  3. All electrical connectors, wiring, switches, extension cords, fuses, etc., must be UL-listed and must be ap­propriate for the load and equipment. Connectors must be soldered or made with UL-Iisted connectors. Wiring, switches, and metal parts must have adequate insulation and over-current safety devices (such as fuses) and be inaccessible to anyone other than the entrant. Exposed electrical equipment or metal that possibly may be energized must be shielded with a nonconducting material or with a grounded metal box to prevent accidental contact.

  4. There must be an accessible, clearly visible on/off switch or other means of disconnect from the 120 or 220 Volt power source.

Student Activities Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook

Project Requirements

A. Display Overview Nonexperimental Project Display

  1. Title

  2. Abstract

  3. Background information, including research

and ACSI Project Approval Form

  1. Conclusions or summaries

  2. Written report

  3. Logbook (optional)

  4. Examples, drawings, models, photographs, tables, graphs, other items to demonstrate the subject

  5. Biblical application/illustration

  6. Display Board Criteria 1. Maximum Size


11

Experimental/Engineering Project Display

  1. Title

  2. Abstract

  3. Background information, including problem and

hypothesis

  1. Experimental design/engineering design

  2. Results, including tables and graphs of data

  3. Conclusion(s)

  4. Written report

  5. Logbook, including ASCI Project Approval Form and additional ISEF forms as needed

  6. Iquipment, samples, or other items from your experiment

  7. Biblical application/illustration

  8. Photographs and/or diagrams to show steps in the process


The exhibit display area may not exceed 48" wide by 30" deep by 72" high from the tabletop. Those exceeding the limit will be penalized in points.

2. Display Board

  1. Possible materials for backboard displays are plywood, wood, Peg-Board, pressed wood, foam core, and cardboard. Backboard sections should be joined together securely to make a rigid support for the display. Items should be securely attached to the backboard. Projects must be freestanding for table display.

  2. The project display should be attractive, creative, eye-catching, neat, and informative.

  3. The project title, hypothesis (experimental projects only), and abstract (approximately 50 words) must be on the display.

  4. Computer-generated graphics and lettering must be the student's work.

  5. The student's name, grade, and school name must be on an identification label (provided in this manual), and the label must be placed on the back of the project in the lower right-hand corner. The student's name and school name must not be visible to the judges.

  6. Electric

All exhibits requiring electricity must be designed for 120 or 220 Volts. The entrant needs to provide appropriate UL-listed cords.

  1. Gas/Water

No gas or water outlets will be provided.

  1. Suitability for Exhibition

Dangerous/unsafe exhibits will not be permitted. (Please refer to the Display Safety Standards.) The fair officials reserve the right to remove any project deemed objectionable or hazardous.

© 2006 ACSI~.

Student Activities Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook
Project Requirements continued
12


  1. Display/Project Information 1. Title/Topic

  2. Topic

(1) A good project is one that is chosen to fit your interests and abilities, so the time you spend selecting a topic is very important for your future success. You will be working with this project for a long time.

(2) Do not choose a topic that you will be unable to do, or a topic that requires equipment that is too costly to obtain. Stay within your abilities and means. Sometimes, equipment can be borrowed from a teacher or a friend, but you should check before choosing your topic.

(3) Be sure that topics encompassing sensitive issues are dealt with from an appropriate Christian perspective, and avoid any topic that may be offensive.

(4) Consider the following suggestions:

(a) Look through the project topic ideas listed in this handbook.

(b) Examine scientific magazines and textbooks for labs and problems. (c) Read current-affairs magazines for possible ideas.

  1. Title

(1) Use a question format.

(2) Make it short, yet descriptive, conveying specific information about your project. 2. Abstract

An abstract is a summary and description of what was done and what happened as a result.

Example: "Three brands of tennis balls were tested to determine which one retained its bounce over the longest period of time. The balls were regularly bounced over a five-week period. Of the three brands tested-Brand A, Brand B, and Brand C-Brand B retained its bounce best."

3. Background information, including research

  1. Nonexperimental projects only

(1) Include research that is helpful for the reader to understand your project. (2) Provide a one-paragraph summary of the research paper.

  1. Experimental projects only

(1) Include a problem and a hypothesis, presented separately.

(a) State the problem in one sentence. It is the question you set out to answer. (b) The hypothesis predicts what you believe will happen.

  1. Experimental only: Experimental design/Engineering design and hypothesis Include a drawing or diagram of the project.

  2. Experimental only: Results including tables and graphs of data

Include a graph, table, or picture with an explanation, pointing out comparisons or trends. 6. Conclusions

  1. Nonexperimental projects: Summary or conclusion Summarize the importance of your model or demonstration.

© 2006 .A4::S1~.

Student Activities Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook
Project Requirements continued
13


b) Experimental projects: Conclusion(s)

(1) Specifically state whether the hypothesis is correct and if not, state the changes that are needed to attain desired results.

(2) State what further experimentation could be done to broaden the scope of the problem.

  1. Written Report

Elementary school students: Each exhibit must include a written report. Reports for grades 1-3 should be handwritten; reports for grades 4-6 may be either handwritten or typed. The extent of detail and length of reports will depend on the grade level of the student, ranging from a few sentences for students at grade levels 1-2 to 200-250 words for students at grade levels 5-6 (for experimental and nonexperimental projects). All sources must be identified/referenced, whether they are from the Internet, computer software, etc. The written report must also include the biblical application/illustration.

Junior/Senior high school students: Each exhibit must include a detailed report, fully footnoted and with

a bibliography. This report should provide details of literary research done on the hypothesis. The written report must also include the biblical application/illustration. The report must be typed, with a minimum of 500 words for junior high students, grades 7-8, and a minimum of 700 words for senior high students, grades 9-12. The junior and senior high reports must follow either the APA style or MLA style.

  1. Logbook

The logbook is the history and the record of progression of your science project. It begins the first day you receive the assignment and ends the day you turn it in. It is a diary for your science project. Every time you work on your project, you need to record your work in your logbook. When your experimentation begins, you will refine your procedure in detail and write it out in your logbook, step-by-step, drawing and labeling any apparatus you use and explaining how all the variables are controlled.

If you complete an experimental or engineering project, you must include the ACSI Project Approval Form in your logbook, as well as any other necessary ISEF forms.

Consent forms are required for photographs of individuals as well as' for behavioral studies. These signed consent forms must be placed in the logbook.

Your data is first taken in your logbook. Your results are first formulated in your logbook. Everything you do on your project is in your logbook!

Remember: From start to finish, everything must be in your logbook. Keep the book neat and clean. It will be displayed with your project at any fair you attend.

9. Examples and Equipment (adhere to safety standards)

  1. Nonexperimental: Examples, drawings, models, photographs, tables, graphs, and other items to demonstrate the subject

b) Experimental: Equipment, samples, or other items from your experiment

  1. Biblical Application/Illustration

Each project must include a related biblical application/illustration, and it must be included on the visual display. The student should demonstrate an understanding of this application/illustration in the written and oral presentations.

  1. Experimental only: Photographs and/or Diagrams

Photographs and/or diagrams should be included in the logbook or on the display to demonstrate the experimental process.

© 2006 .ACSI~.

Student Activities Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook

Project/Category Topic ldeas

  1. Elementary Project Ideas

1. Nonexperimental

  1. Identify and label a collection (such as shells, leaves, rocks, insects).

  2. Research and label the parts of a plant (or a computer, a car engine, etc.).

  3. Research and label the parts of the human ear (or the eye, skeletal system, etc.).

  4. Research and label body parts of an animal or insect.

  5. Make a model of the solar system.

  6. Make an electromagnet and explain the operational principles.

  7. Root a plant and explain the process involved.

h) Record cloud formations (or rainfall) in a chart over a period of time.

2. Experimental Ideas

  1. Which is dirtier, rainwater or tap water? Collect and compare water samples.

  2. What material produces the most static cling to a balloon?

  3. How does sunlight (or lack of it) affect the growth of a plant?

  4. Which type of soil is best for growing? (Using the same kind of plant, try different types of soil, ones

with different added nutrients, etc.)

  1. Which paper towel is most absorbent? What ingredient/content makes the difference?

  2. What ordinary household product(s) can be used to prevent rust?

  3. What household/cooking items effectively prevent sliced apples from browning?

h) Do fingernails grow faster than toenails? Carefully outline nails; chart growth over a specific period.

  1. Books to Read for Additional Ideas/Suggestions

Important: The following list of books is for your convenience in finding project ideas. All projects, regard­less of their source, may need to be altered/modified to comply with the ACSI Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook rules.

The Know How Book of Experiments by Heather Amery Ideas for Science Fair Projects by Robert Gardner

More Ideas for Science Fair Projects by Robert Gardner Research Adventures for Young Scientists by George Barr

More Research Adventures for Young Scientists by George Barr Mr. Wizard's Experiments for Young Scientists by Don Herbert

B. Problem-Solving Project/Category Ideas

Primary category Ideas
15


1. Life Science

  1. Physical Science

  2. Physical Science

© 2006 ACSI~.
Animal Behavior-ethology, learned or instinctive animal behavior, learning, animal biorhythms, etc.

Astronomy-study of the composition, motions, and structure of the universe. Biochemistry-molecular biology, molecular genetics, enzymes, photosynthesis, blood chemistry, protein chemistry, food chemistry, hormones, etc.

Student Activities Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook
Project/Category Topic Ideas continued
16


4. Life Science

5. Life Science

6. Physical Science

7. Physical Science

8. Physical Science

9. Physical Science

10. Life Science

11. Physical Science

12. Life Science

13. Physical Science

14. Life Science

15. Physical Science

1 6. Life Science

© 2006 K:SI~.
Biology/Microbiology-bacteriology, virology, proto-zoology, fungal and bacterial genetics, yeast, animal ecology, plant ecology, plant and animal life in an ecological area, etc.

Botany-agriculture, agronomy, horticulture, forestry, plant biorhythms, palynology, plant anatomy, plant taxonomy, plant physiology, plant pathology, plant genetics, hydroponics, algology, mycology, etc.

Chemistry-physical chemistry, organic chemistry (other than biochemistry), inorganic chemistry, materials, plastics, fuels, pesticides, metallurgy, soil chemistry.

COmputer Science--development of computer hardware, software engineering, internet networking and communications, graphics (including human interface), simulations/virtual reality or computational science (including data structures, encryption, coding, and information theory).

Crystallography--chemistry (crystal composition), mathematics/computers (symmetry), and physics (lattice structure).

Earth/Space Sciences-geology, geophysics, physical oceanography, meteorology, atmospheric physics, seismology, petroleum, geography, speleology, mineralogy, topography, optical astronomy, radio astronomy, astrophysics, etc.

Ecology-Pollution-study of the eutrophication of lakes: social sciences (human beings who caused the problem), chemistry (process of eutrophication), botany (growth of algae), engineering (water purification systems), medical sciences (health effects on human beings), microbiology (effects on microorganisms),

zoology (fish population), and biology (study of relations between organisms and polluted environment).

Engineering/Electronics--civil, mechanical, aeronautical, chemical, electrical, photo­graphic, sound, automotive, marine, heating.and refrigerating, transportation, environmental engineering, power transmission and generation, electronics, com­munications, architecture, bioengineering, lasers, computers, instrumentation, etc.

Human Psychology/Social Sciences-psychology, sociology, anthropology, archaeol­ogy, ethnology, linguistics, animal behavior (learned or instinctive), learning, perception, urban problems, reading problems, public opinion surveys, educational testing, etc.

Instruments-the design and construction of a telescope, bubble chamber, laser, or other instrument would be properly placed in engineering if the design and con­struction were the primary purpose of the project. If a telescope was constructed, the telescope was used to gather the data, and an analysis of the data was pre­sented, the project should be placed in earth/space sciences.

MarineScience-animal behavior (schooling of fish), botany (marine algae), zoology (sea urchins), or biology (plant and animal life of tide pools, estuaries, etc.).

Mathematics--calculus, geometry, abstract algebra, number theory, statistics, complex analysis, probability, topology, logic, operations research, other topics in pure and applied mathematics.

MedicaISciences-medicine, dentistry, pharmacology, veterinary medicine, pathology, ophthalmology, nutrition, sanitation, pediatrics, dermatology, allergology, speech and hearing, etc.





Student Activities Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook
Project/Category Topic Ideas continued
17



www.neiu.edu/-pjdolan/chemistr:y.htm http://sln.fi.edu/tfi/activity/act -sum m.html www.exploratorium.edu/scienceexplorer/index.html http://school.discover:y.com/sciencefai rcentrall scifairstudio/ideas. html www.spo~lvania.k12.va.us/bms/bmssf.htm www.energyquest.ca.gov/projects/index.html http://earthquake.usgs.gov/4kids/sciencefair. htm I www.isd77.k12.mn.us/resources/d/ideas.html http://mathforum.org/teachers/mathproiect.html http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler I experi. html http://photoscience.la.asu.edu/photo$,yn/education/learn . htm I http://parentingteens.about.com/librar:y/sp/blscpr031 .htm

ht1;p:1 I photoscience.la.asu.edul photosynl educationl sciencefai r. htm I .WWW.ag.ohio-state.edu/-breads/sciencefair.html .WWW.twingroves.district96.k12.iJ.usISciencelnternet!GetStarted.html
17. Physical Science Meteorology-study of the structure and composition of our atmosphere, weather

and climate, and storms.

  1. Physical Science Oceanography-study of the structure and dynamics of the ocean.

19. Physical Science Physics-solid state, optics, acoustics, particle, nuclear, atomic, plasma, supercon-

ductivity, fluid and gas dynamics, thermodynamics, semiconductors, magnetism, quantum mechanics, biophysics, etc.

20. Physical Science Rockets-
for meteorological instruments), engineering (design of a rocket), physics (comput­ing rocket trajectories), or medical sciences (effects of rocket acceleration on mice).

21. Physical/Life Science Space-Related Projects-many projects involving "space" do not go into earth/ space sciences: botany (effects of zero gravity on plants), medical sciences (effects of gravity on humans), engineering (development of closed environmental system for space travel).

22. Life Science Speech and Hearing-human psychology/social sciences (reading problems),

engineering (hearing aids), medical sciences (speech defects), physics (sound), and zoology (structure of the ear).

23. Life Science Vitamins-biochemistry (how the body deals with vitamins), chemistry (analysis),

and medical sciences (effects of vitamin deficiencies).

24. Life Science Zoology-animal genetics, ornithology, ichthyology, herpetology, entomology,

animal ecology, anatomy, paleontology, cellular physiology, animal biorhythms, animal husbandry, cytology, histology, animal physiology, neurophysiology, invertebrate biology, etc.

C. Website Resources

Please note: The following list of websites does not imply ACSI endorsement of the organizations or of materials on the websites. ACSI does not endorse the content on these websites or guarantee that all content would be suitable and/or appropriate for ACSI Science Fairs. Please be sure to select items that will meet the criteria presented in this manual. www.billnye.com/flash.html www.cdli.ca/sciencefairs

ht1;p:1 Ihomewo~pot.com/sciencefair www.super-science-fair-projects.com www.all-science-fair-projects.com

ht1;p:1 Iscienceclub.orgl Ikidprojl.html www.ars.usda.gov/is/kids/fair/ideas.htm www.scienceproject.com www.scifair.org/ideas/index.shtml www.rossarts.org/naples/ideas.htm www.top-science-fair-projects.com ht1;p: Ilyouth. net! nsrclsci/sci. index. html www.madsci.or9Iexperiments

ht1;p:1 Icamel. math.ca/Education/mpsf ht1;p:1 I pbskids.org/zoom I activities I scil

© 2006 ACSI~.




Student Activities Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook

44

Sample Project Plan for a Nonexperimental Project

ACSI Science Fair Nonexperimental Project

Date of Fair: 2/29/2005 Project #:

Name: Bobby Stevens

Grade: 4 Teacher: _M_r_._E_a_s_vw __ a_y _

Project title: Hot -Ai r Ba 1 loons

Subject being demonstrated: There are These parts must all be present,

xxx

(assigned by chairperson on the day of the fair)

several parts that make up a hot-air balloon. and they must function properly in order for the

hot-air balloon to rise.

What will the demonstration show? It will show that when hot air is enclosed in a plastic bag, the bag will rise. The rising bag is a result of hot air rising. Materials required: Dry cleaner bag, birthday candles, straight pins, drinking straws, tape, matches, camera, and film

How will special materials and equipment be obtained? This proj ect does not require any special materials or equipment.

Method used to demonstrate subject (use backside if needed):

  1. Go outside on a calm evening.

  2. Tape the hole in the top of the dry cleaner bag so that it is closed.

  3. Place straws in a large x to fit the opening at the bottom of the dry cleaner bag. Make the bottom of the bag as wide as possible.

  4. Poke four small holes in the bottom of the dry cleaner bag to put the straws in place.

  5. Using the tape, secure the ends of the straws.

  6. Using twenty straight pins, place five on each section of the x by poking the

pins through the straw from the bottom, with the points facing up.

  1. Place a candle on each pin.

  2. Light the candles. The hot-air balloon will rise. 9. Photograph each step.

Planned method of presentation (graphs, tables, photographs, etc.): Photographs Cautions: 1. Parent supervision is needed for these types of proj ects .

  1. This particular project should not be conducted if a fire hazard such as dry grass exists.

© 2006 P£:SI~.

Student Activities Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook

Sample Nonexperimental Project Worksheet
45


ACSI Science Fair Nonexperimental Project

Date of Fair: Project #: (assigned by chairperson on the day of the fair)

Name: _

Grade: Teacher:

Project title:

Subject being demonstrated: _

What will the demonstration show?

Materials required:

How will special materials and equipment be obtained? _

Method used to demonstrate subject (use backside if needed): _

Planned method of presentation (graphs, tables, photographs, etc.): _

Cautions: _

© 2006 AC.S[~.





Student Activities Science Fair Coordinator's Handbook

Sample Project Plan for an Experimental Project
46


ACSI Science Fair Experimental Project Date of Fair: .2/29/200 c:; Project #:
xxx
(assigned by chairperson on the day of the fair)


Name: F.ll i e May

Grade: 6 Teacher: _M_r_._E_a_s_yW~_a~y _

Project title: The Effect of Briqht Liqht on Bleach Effectiveness

Problem that will be investigated: Bleach is effective in removing stains from clothing, and bright sunlight also tends to bleach colors. I will investigate whether the effects can be combined to increase the effectiveness of bleach in stain removal.

Description of experiment: Several pieces of white cotton cloth will be stained with grape jelly. Then the pieces of stained cloth will be exposed to bleach, bleach and a bright sunlamp, and a sunlamp alone to determine if the combination of bleach and the sunlamp is more effective in stain removal than the bleach or sunlamp alone.

Experimental hypothesis: Bleach is more effective when used with bright light to remove stains.

Experimental control: Several pieces of stained cloth will be kept separate and exposed only to water instead of water and bleach. The controls will be kept out of bright light for the experiment.

Experimental variable: The experimental variable is the exposure to bright light. Control variables: The control variables are everything else that could affect the re­moval of the stain. The amount of the bleach in the water will remain the same, the time of exposure will remain the same, the intensity of the light will remain the same, the same cloth and stain will be used for all samples, and the water temperature will remain the same.

Materials required: Cotton cloth, household bleach, grape jelly, sunlamp, camera, and film

How will special materials and equipment be obtained? The sunlamp will be purchased at a hardware store.

Planned experimental procedure (use back side if needed):

  1. Divide cotton cloth into 24 squares, number each with a marking pen, and stain each with a smear of grape jelly. Let jelly stand for five minutes before rins­ing each piece in cold water for one minute.

(Procedure continued on back.)

Data to be taken: Photograph the results and display.

Planned method of presentation (graphs, tables, photographs, etc.): Photographs and actual pieces of cloth used in experiments

© 2006 PCSI~.




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