Test scores) with debate scholarships. The Spicer Debate Forum competes in two year-long policy debate formats: ndt and nfa-ld. We’ve national semis or finals in both in the last decade.


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NameTest scores) with debate scholarships. The Spicer Debate Forum competes in two year-long policy debate formats: ndt and nfa-ld. We’ve national semis or finals in both in the last decade.
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About MSDI & Missouri State U..


For twenty years, the Missouri State Debate Institute has offered an excellent educational experience in the middle of the high school topic. MSDI is distinct from other camps in six ways. First, our skills focus assures that a typical 2-week debater gets nearly 80 speeches, including over 20 debates. Second, we emphasize the largest cases on topic, with students getting both aff and neg rounds on each. Third, our senior faculty are comparable with top lab leaders in any camp. Fourth, MSDI students can earn highly transferable college credit in public speaking for a minimal cost. Fifth, we respect variance in home debate circuits – our goal is to improve line by line debating in ways that will help students no matter who judges in their home circuit. Finally, our price is below any comparable camp and far below most camps. Our 2016 information will be available shortly at: http://debate.missouristate.edu/camp.htm.

Missouri State University is a large comprehensive university (enrollment over 24k), with nearly any major you might want. The university has excellent academic scholarship support – most debaters combine academic “entitlement” scholarships (guaranteed based on GPA/test scores) with debate scholarships. The Spicer Debate Forum competes in two year-long policy debate formats: NDT and NFA-LD. We’ve national semis or finals in both in the last decade. Our debaters have an average GPA over 3.5, a 97% graduation rate, and 70% complete law/grad school afterward. Our program is a high-impact academic experience with an exceptional alumni network. Please contact Dr. Eric Morris for more information (EricMorris@MissouriState.edu).

http://debate.missouristate.edu/

http://www.missouristate.edu/FinancialAid/scholarships/

Bulk Data Negative



A2 Economy Adv

Economic decline now

US Economy already in decline; many other factors


Samantha Sharf 5/29/15, Writer for Forbes, http://www.forbes.com/sites/samanthasharf/2015/05/29/u-s-economy-contracted-0-7-in-first-quarter-2015-down-from-first-estimate/, “US economy contracted 0.7% in First quarter 2015”

The economy shrank last quarter thanks to a decline in some inputs and barely there growth in others. The questions now are if winter weather is blame and what it all means for the Federal Reserve. On Friday, the Bureau of Economic Analysis released its second estimate of real gross domestic product for the first quarter of this year — covering January, February and March. The release showed output in the United States decreasing at a rate of 0.7%. This is substantial deceleration from the fourth quarter of 2014 when real GDP grew 2.2%. Economists on average were anticipating a 0.9% contraction Friday. The figure, which measure the value of goods and services produced in the U.S., is down from BEA’s advance Q1 estimate which last month said that the economy grew 0.2%. The 0.9% shift into negative territory, said BEA in the release, was due to weaker than previously thought private inventory investment and a larger than expected import figure. Imports are subtracted in the calculation of GDP. “In short, GDP looks even weaker than before, but we remain skeptical about the sudden-deterioration signal,” wrote Jim O’Sullivan, chief U.S. economist at High Frequency Economics in a note. “The pattern is somewhat reminiscent of early 2014, when a 2.1% rate of decline in Q1 was followed by a +4.6% pace in Q2.” Last year many economists, including those at the Fed, ultimately said colder than usual temperatures explained away most of the decline. Temporary factors may be at play again this year. Parts of the country were hit by more snow than usual. Others factors some say held back growth this year include the strong dollar making imports less expensive and exports more so; pressure on the energy sector from lower oil prices; consumers saving rather than spending money saved on oil; and dock worker strikes on the West Coast that disrupted that flow of trade. PNC Chief Economist Stuart Hoffman pointed out, “There is evidence that the BEA’s seasonal adjustment process is not fully correcting for quarterly variation in GDP; over the past 20 years GDP growth in the first quarter has been well below that in the other three quarters of the year.” The overall downturn compared to the fourth quarter reflects slowing exports, nonresidential fixed income investment and local government spending. Personal consumption expenditures, private inventory investment, resident fixed income and federal government spending, on the other hand, were up. PCE, however, decelerated compared to the prior quarter. The 0.1% boost in federal spending comes on the heels of a 7.3% decreased in the fourth quarter BEA now judges that the price index for gross domestic purchases — which measures prices paid by U.S. residents — decreased 1.6%. Excluding the price of food and energy the price index increased 0.2%. Real personal consumption expenditures increased 1.8% slow from 4.4% in gains in the fourth quarter. Gross domestic income increased 1.4%.

Global economies are experiencing slowdown that is expected to remain


Thomas Hirst 4/7/15, Author for Business Insider, http://www.businessinsider.com/imf-world-economic-outlook-slow-growth-2015-4, “The era of strong economic growth is over- and we should be worried”

The International Monetary Fund has got some bad news for us — the slower rate of economic growth could be here to stay. In its latest World Economic Outlook update, the IMF says a combination of slower catch-up growth by emerging economies and ageing societies in the developed world are set to hold back global growth despite signs of a recovery setting in. In the aftermath of the financial crisis, potential growth in advanced economies has slowed from an average of over 2% per year to around 1.6%. Here's what that looks like: As you can see from the chart, most of the fall in potential growth is coming from the squeezing of that middle brown section — employment growth. That represents the potential growth in the number of employees in an economy and it is falling as Western societies get older. This process, according to the IMF, is likely to hold back growth in future. As the Fund puts it: Working-age population growth is likely to decline significantly in most advanced economies, particularly Germany and Japan, where it will reach about –0.2 percent a year by 2020. At the same time, rapid aging is expected to further decrease average trend labor force participation rates, offsetting the positive effect of continued population increases on overall labor supply. Meanwhile emerging economies have also seen growth rates slipping since the crisis, albeit from higher starting points. This is largely due to slower catch-up growth as the technological improvements and increases in educational achievement over the past few decades that have helped to narrow the gap with their advanced peers are unlikely to be repeated. What does this all mean? Well, firstly it means that living standards are going to struggle to rise in future at the same pace as they have done. Workers experiencing sluggish wage growth since the crisis may find that it becomes the norm rather than the exception in future. Unfortunately, slower potential growth also has worrying implications for public finances. Governments can lower the burden of public debt in two ways, either by cutting spending to reduce borrowing or through the economy growing faster than debt costs. Slower growth means that cutting debt is likely to rely more heavily on spending cuts than simply allowing growth to erode the problem. Yet the very factor holding back growth — ageing societies — is also likely to make such cuts harder to achieve as older people use state services such as healthcare more intensively than their younger peers. As it says in the WEO (emphasis added): Reduced prospects for potential growth in the medium term have important implications for policy. In advanced economies, lower potential growth makes it more difficult to reduce still-high public and private debt...In emerging market economies, lower potential growth makes it more challenging to rebuild fiscal buffers. Despite the gloom, there are ways in which countries can act to ameliorate some of the consequences of this growth squeeze. In particular, the IMF suggests state support for innovation and further education should be policy goals as well as providing an environment that promotes increased labour force participation by those of working age, especially for women. More controversially, perhaps, the IMF also says providing support for demand through accommodative central bank policies and also, where possible, government spending may also be needed to boost investment. One subject that the Fund elects not to discuss in any detail is the potential growth benefits of higher immigration. For example, Britain's Office for Budget Responsibility, the government's budget watchdog, recently noted that higher than forecast immigration over the past few years had "raised potential output growth by 0.5 per cent over the forecast period via 16+ population growth".
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